Jack rechnet ab

Jack Rechnet Ab Film-Bewertung

Außergewöhnlicher Gangsterfilm um einen Londoner Berufskiller, der nach Newcastle fährt, um den Tod seines Bruders zu rächen. Jack rechnet ab (Originaltitel: Get Carter) ist ein britischer Gangsterfilm aus dem Jahre Regie führte Mike Hodges. Der Film basiert auf dem Roman Jack. 14 Ergebnisse für "Jack rechnet ab". Überspringen und zu Haupt-​Suchergebnisse gehen. Amazon Prime. GRATIS-Versand durch Amazon. Für alle Kunden mit. Jack rechnet ab | Lewis, Ted | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Mit im Raum und wie Anna von der Darbietung abgestoßen ist Jack Carter (​Michael Caine), der lieber dem Whisky zuspricht. Gerald Fletcher rät Carter davon ab.

jack rechnet ab

Jack rechnet ab | Lewis, Ted | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Mit im Raum und wie Anna von der Darbietung abgestoßen ist Jack Carter (​Michael Caine), der lieber dem Whisky zuspricht. Gerald Fletcher rät Carter davon ab. Außergewöhnlicher Gangsterfilm um einen Londoner Berufskiller, der nach Newcastle fährt, um den Tod seines Bruders zu rächen.

Schnell findet er zum einen heraus, dass an der Version, sein Bruder sei betrunken mit dem Wagen ins Wasser gestürzt, vieles nicht stimmt.

Je weiter er stöbert, desto tiefer dringt Carter in einen Filz von Kriminalität ein. Anmelden via Facebook. Home Filme Jack rechnet ab.

Deine Bewertung. Vormerken Ignorieren Zur Liste Kommentieren. Michael Caine. Ian Hendry. Britt Ekland.

John Osborne. Tony Beckley. George Sewell. Geraldine Moffat. Dorothy White. Rosemarie Dunham. Petra Markham. The original title of Lewis' novel was 'Jack's Return Home' and years later was retitled 'Get Carter' to tie-in with the smash success of the film adaptation starring Michael Caine.

The film was set in Newcastle-upon-Tyne and the surrounding area, but here in the novel the setting is believed to be Scunthorpe after our protagonist changes trains at Doncaster to embark upon an explosive weekend of violence and debauchery in which the finale is just as shocking as its film counterpart, only moreso.

A heart-banging trip of sheer dynamite with a brilliant main character! This is the book that became the movie GET CARTER and it's terrific for its fusion of social realist themes derived from the kitchen sink tradition with the pace and structure of an urban thriller or urban western.

This was the stuff that made s crime fiction so great. Lewis also invented the regional crime drama.

He was the first! Shelves: suspense-thriller , read , audio-books , roman-noir. Nick Perry's dramatisation of Ted Lewis's crime classic.

Shelves: fradio , too-sexy-for-maiden-aunts , revenge , families , autumn , noir , radio-4 , gangsters , published , summer Bettie's Books Bettie's Books Jack, born and raised in the northern steel town, left home quite some time ago to make his fortune in London, and, being a handy lad and inclined towards pitiless immorality, he eventually found his place as a mob enforcer.

Since then, Jack has done all kinds of awful things at the behest of his employers, East End racketeers, Les and Gerald Fletcher, and in so doing, has earned himself a real reputation.

Quite often, though, he lets his heart rule his head. But even more so is this return to Scunthorpe. But now Frank is dead, killed in an apparent drink-driving accident.

Frank was a barman, after all, and he worked in a particularly rough part of a particularly rough town. However, he was not known to be an unstable character, and in fact, compared to his brother, was a clean-living citizen — and this is the point where Jack becomes curious, refusing to believe that Frank would have climbed into his car having consumed an entire bottle of whiskey.

It is only , and blue movies are still taboo, but there is a voracious demand for them on the underground circuit, particularly among those interested in the sex adventures of very, very young females.

Jack continues to resist, even when he receives direct orders from Gerald and Les, as delivered by a pair of London hitmen, the brutal Con McCarty and camp-as-hell Peter the Dutchman And what role does Doreen play?

The more Jack evades attempts on his life, the more unedifying truths he uncovers, and the more personal this becomes.

In fact, later editions of the novel were republished under that very title. In truth, there are a lot of similarities, even down to certain lines of dialogue, but there are some differences too.

In addition to that, perhaps the most famous liberty the movie took was in its transposition of the story from Scunthorpe to the even more grimily picturesque Newcastle.

That said, none of these are really major issues. Where both the novel and the movie are united is in their warts-and-all portrayal of an unforgiving British gangland, setting their narratives against dingy working-class backdrops, and underscoring them with a level of sleaze that has shocking power even today.

But back to the novel. He could create atmosphere for sure, but he was no poet. I can only imagine the strength of this narrative back in On occasion, he reminisces about his early youth — the last happy time he knew, we suspect — when he and Frank got on their bikes and explored the woods and wastelands on the outskirts of town.

These are moving sequences and poignant reminders that even monsters once were children. As such, for the bulk of this novel, Jack is a coldly merciless figure.

But with his sad and premature death at the age of 42, the series ended there. I'd never read the novel before, but saw its film adaptation many years ago.

I remembered it as a brisk, hard-boiled crime flick, and remembered Michael Caine's take on the protagonist in particular.

This is not Batman 's courtly Alfred; this is not the charming rogue whatever his name was of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.

Those later Caine parts, vs. Daniel Craig's. I can now say that Caine's remembered performance, in other words, matched I'd never read the novel before, but saw its film adaptation many years ago.

I can now say that Caine's remembered performance, in other words, matched the novel's depiction of the character perfectly.

Jack's an example of what is called, I think, a "hard man" -- underworld jargon for what might also be called, less kindly, a thug.

He returns to his hometown after many years for a sad occasion: his brother Frank's funeral. But mourning does not suit a hard man, especially a smart one with a dangerously insatiable curiosity.

Before long, Jack concludes that the automobile accident in which Frank died smacks of something other than an accident, after all. The book documents, in Jack's rat-a-tat narrator's voice, the few days it takes him to set things about as right as they'll ever be.

Get Carter 's prose could serve as a textbook example of hardboiled voice. The club was crowded. Old men sat riveted by dominoes.

Young men thronged the six dart boards. There was no music, no singing, no women. Just the bad lighting and the good dark brown beer and the plain floor and a bar that was decorated only by some barrels of beer lined up at one end.

It's almost Hemingwayish, except that this book's author, Ted Lewis, clearly had no literary pretensions: every monosyllable serves no purpose beyond the story.

Even that sample, in its focus on setting, does nothing but frame the canvas. The words and the rhythm are merciless, and, well, that's Jack all over.

It kept me riveted, start to finish. So why only four stars? Here's the thing: nothing like softness exists in Jack Carter's world, and he won't pretend it does.

Consider his final moment with Frank, by himself beside the casket just before the funeral: "Well, Frank," I said. I said a few words although I don't know what I said and bowed my head on the edge of the casket for a few minutes, then I sat up and undid my coat and took out my fags.

I lit up and blew out the smoke slowly and looked at the last of Frank. Nothing soft, see? Nothing sentimental.

The resistance to that fifth star is wholly mine, at this moment in the US of Over the course of the book, Jack encounters a handful of women, all of them with some tie to Frank, and also with one tie or another to Jack's adversaries.

He treats them coldly, and occasionally brutally, and reports these ugly moments in flat tones. A common locution: "I gave her one alongside the head.

But against a backdrop of recent headlines, reading these scenes in Get Carter required of me a lot of mental disengagement.

If you can manage that trick more easily than I could -- regarding the story entirely in its own terms, given its setting, time, and characters -- and if your tastes in fiction encompass the noir and the hard-boiled, I have no doubt that you'll reach for the fifth star yourself.

Highly recommended. Although this is not a book I would have picked up on my own it's my book club's September choice , I found Ted Lewis' writing refreshing simply in that it is so different from most of what I've read recently or ever!?

The British references certainly contribute to that, but there's a rough-and-tumble, Hobbesian view of life Lewis employs lived?

Speaking of "character," Lewis' characterizations are first-rate. He borrows a bit from Dickens in that regard, as it's easy to see the type of people the protagonist Jack Carter describes.

To summarize, Carter returns to his hometown for the funeral of his estranged brother, Frank, who has died in a straightforward manner--drunk, in a car accident--except for the fact that Frank never has been known to drink to excess, and never scotch, in any case.

Complicating things are the presence of Frank's or is she really Jack's? The dividing line between the two allies and enemies is fuzzy, to say the least, but Carter is determined to discover who was responsible for Frank's death, and what it was Frank knew that made him a target for fatal violence.

When I ended the book, I noticed a short biography of its author, Lewis, along with a photo of him on a back fly-leaf.

Lewis lived from , barely surpassing the assumed lifespan of his "hero," so I'm guessing he knew a little about the nature of the circumstances Carter endured from Seeing his bio and photo made the story that much more compelling.

This was tough to get through, which is impressive because it wasn't especially long, dense, or literary. I guess the British slang was a little weird, but that wasn't what bothered me.

If I could identify a culprit, it was that Lewis went into such absurd detail describing actions and surroundings that didn't matter.

If I read carefully, I'm sure I could piece together a map of every single location in the book, but what's the point? It gives me a greater appreciation for writers like Chandler This was tough to get through, which is impressive because it wasn't especially long, dense, or literary.

It gives me a greater appreciation for writers like Chandler who was so economical with his prose, cutting to the chase by providing a feeling of what's going on if not necessarily every little detail.

The story was dull, about a guy trying to avenge his brother's death and find the murderer. There were the typical crime staples along the way, tough guys and weak, troubled women who need them.

Or double cross them. Or whatever. Honestly, I lost interest early on and probably should have given up on it. But I persevered.

And, as usual, I was rewarded with an agonizing experience and a little bit of regret. Next time I'm bored of a book after the first 40 - 50 pages, I'll think back on this one and remind myself that it's just not worth it.

If one were looking for a tough guy crime novel, with violence aplenty, sort of like a Mickey Spillane from the North of England, this fits the bill.

If one were looking for a British version of Richard Stark's Parker novels, this fits the bill. If one wanted a print equivalent to a Jason Statham movie, this fits the bill.

However, Ted Lewis invests this nasty bit of fiction with vivid descriptions of a dying industrial town the steel mill and the brick factory become characters in the book , the type of place where grim prospects are varnished over by pints of bitter and football.

He drops fun allusions to Doctor Who and soft-core filmmaker Harrison Marks. There is humor grim , social commentary, and mayhem for all in the first book of the Carter trilogy the others will be coming this fall too.

I assume Lewis was inspired by Richard Stark. Does anyone know for sure? Originally published as Jack's Return Home it was republished as Get Carter , which is also the name of the film starring Michael Caine.

A tale of revenge in British noir of the s that takes place in the gritty industrial north. Jack Carter - It's a rainy night in the mill town of Scunthorpe when a London fixer named Jack Carter steps off a northbound train.

He's left the neon lights and mod lifestyle of Soho behind to come north to his hometo 1 in the Jack Carter Trilogy.

He's left the neon lights and mod lifestyle of Soho behind to come north to his hometown for a funeral--his brother Frank's.

Frank was very drunk when he drove his car off a cliff and that doesn't sit well with Jack. Jack and Frank didn't exactly like one another.

They hadn't spoken in years and Jack is far from the sentimental type. So it takes more than a few people by surprise when Jack starts plying his trade in order to get to the bottom of his brother's death.

Then again, Frank's last name was Carter, and that's Jack's name too. Sometimes that's enough.

Gritty, violent and fast-moving story of revenge. London gangster Jack Carter comes back to his hometown in northern England for his brother's funeral.

Everyone says that it was a drunk-driving accident, but that's not what Jack Carter thinks, and he's going to find out what really happened and get the people responsible.

Suddenly, everyone's out to get Carter. I enjoyed Ted Lewis' tightly coiled writing style. It's very Dashiell Hammett think Blood Simple except for the northern England accents Gritty, violent and fast-moving story of revenge.

It's very Dashiell Hammett think Blood Simple except for the northern England accents, which to my American eye, made even the scummiest of characters a little bit adorable.

My only criticism is that there were so many guys out to get Carter that it was difficult to keep track of them all and how they fit into the local crime hierarchy.

Get Carter was published in and an excellent movie version starring Michael Caine as the title character came out the following year.

Jack Carter's a very dichotomous character. He's violent, cool, treats women horribly, a liar, but a guy with a code.

When his straight-arrow brother dies, he decides he needs to find out what happened. And so he does.

Jack reminds me a lot of my other favorite crime character, Parker; both are determined to the point of blindness, both are pretty much the toughest guy around, both aren't about to be stopped by little things like "the law" and "injury".

This is part of why I loved this book. Also, Jack Carter's a very dichotomous character. Also, Lewis does a great job of sinking you into a different world and, for us, a different time; keep Google open so you can find out what some of the brands mentioned are in a very entertaining way.

For such a terse little book pages! Such a good book, and absolutely worth your time if you like rough, dark crime novels. The movie brought me here.

Michael Caine. Ian Hendry. Britt Ekland. George Sewell. Es gibt Filme, denen sieht man das Alter nicht an - abgesehen von der Mode.

Dieser ist so einer. Sein Geheimnis der Zeitlosigkeit steckt nicht nur in der spannenden Story mit wohldosierten Highlights.

Dazu zählen knallharte Schlägereien und Schiessereien, auch Tote gibt es ab und zu und für recht freizügigen Sex. Die Schnitte und Abbrüche sind ein weiterer Pluspunkt.

Mehr erfahren. Anonymer User. Er spielt den recht widersprüchlichen Charakter Jack Carter, der einserseits nicht davor zurückschreckt, seinen Freund vom Gegner auseinandernehmen zu lassen, jedoch weint, als er Bilder seiner Nichte sieht, die einem Kinderpornoring zum Opfer fiel.

Fazit: top Darsteller nicht nur Michael Caine , NEWS - Bestenlisten. Die 25 besten Gangsterfilme. Ähnliche Filme. Get Carter - Die Wahrheit tut weh.

Get Carter - Original Trailer. The Proposition - Tödliches Angebot. We've got you covered https://mhsreenactment.se/disney-filme-stream-deutsch/arrow-staffel-3-schauspieler.php the buzziest new releases of the day. Personally, I prefer crime to mystery, but https://mhsreenactment.se/action-filme-stream/arpeggio-of-blue-steel-stream-deutsch.php are quite enjoyable when they are done. Perfect World. Trivia About Get Carter. Jack Carter's a very dichotomous character. User folgen 9 Follower Lies die Kritiken.

Taking place between Thursday Night and Sunday morning there's no time to blink let alone breath as Carter tackles his problems at an unrelenting pace.

Having as much in common with kitchen Tell him. Having as much in common with kitchen sink dramas such as Saturday Night and Sunday Morning as violent revenge thrillers like The Hunter the bodies still manage to pile up by the final page thanks to Carter's no holds barred attitude.

Lewis really captured the time and place with his prose, the description of working class lifestyles in Britain in the 70s painted in true grim light and the attitudes are guaranteed to shock in this age of cotton wool and insane politcal correctness.

Not that I'm advocating violence towards women, rape, murder and mayhem, underage pornography, bent cops, paki bashing or anything else that takes place during these three days but I think ignoring the fact that it actually used to happen and still does happen is even more absurd than those who perpetrate such things; there's no revelling in the gruesome details, this is the true bleak reality of it and Lewis makes it clear that it's not a glamourous life.

Incredibly this novel was the basis for three movie adaptations but I think it's fair to say that none of them captured the true essence of the book.

Michael Caine may have come closest in but having seen it a couple of times I know for a fact it was toned down and several aspects changed despite my having forgotten the entire plot by the time it came to reading the book.

Of the two American versions I would recommend the blaxploitation version Hit Man over the Stallone abomination every time.

Ted Lewis died at the horribly young age of 42 but wrote several more novels after this one, I think after the brilliant promise shown in this novel I will have to check out more of his work.

Satisfyingly grim but I missed some leavening wit or intelligence. Good read but no Red Harvest.

Having seen the original classic film version of " Get Carter " umpteen times over the years it was impossible for the film portrayals not to completely inform the story's characters in my mind's eye.

This familiarity also meant the story held few surprises though there are some interesting points of divergence. I would rather have approached this book without these preconceptions.

Like you need me to tell you, this is a classic 'avenging angel' tale, and Jack Carter, the avenging angel, wi Having seen the original classic film version of " Get Carter " umpteen times over the years it was impossible for the film portrayals not to completely inform the story's characters in my mind's eye.

Like you need me to tell you, this is a classic 'avenging angel' tale, and Jack Carter, the avenging angel, will not rest until there is full restitution for some serious sins.

Putting the film to one side, the book stands on its own merits. What Ted Lewis achieves brilliantly, in common with all great genre fiction, is to say something else about the world.

In this instance he evokes the late s, and the Britain I remember vividly as I grew up in the s. A violent, bored, depressed place trying to come to terms with the slow death of traditional industries and pre-War certainties.

Ted Lewis also skewers that ambiguous strata of society where criminality and respectability combine. This a world where very nasty things happen - brutality, exploitation and casual violence are the norm.

The reason the film is such an enduring classic is because Ted Lewis wrote " Jack's Return Home " retitled " Get Carter " after the film was released , a perfect crime novel, and essential reading.

Anyone who enjoys this book, and is looking for something with similar qualities, should seek out Derek Raymond 's Factory novels.

View all 3 comments. Considering the movie adaptation of this novel is one of my favorite crime films, it's hard to give the book that inspired the movie anything less than 5 stars.

That said, the book originally published as "Jack's Return Home" is a hell of a fun read. Violent and morally complex, the action plays as character study to a man who is on the edge of losing his humanity.

Great characters, dialogue, and a strong sense of place. This book deserves to be rediscovered as a hard-boiled classic.

View 2 comments. Very Jacobean and very atmospheric. There are wonderful descriptions of people and places. He was the kind of man that fat men like to stand next to.

He had no hair and a handlebar moustache that his face made look a foot long on each side. They had black pupils an eighth of an inch in diameter surrounded by whites the colour of the fish part of fish fingers.

The Mr Bigs hang out in hugely expensive but equally tasteless homes. And as for Scunthorpe — it possibly gets a raw deal, and then again possibly not.

There was an old fat drummer in an old tux and a bloke on an electric bass and at the organ with all the magic attachments sat a baldheaded man with a shiny face, a blue crew-neck sweater and a green cravat.

Pity that Ted Lewis has gone View 1 comment. Set in Doncaster in the Seventies, this book is in the great tradition of the It's Grim Up North school, where gritty kitchen sink dramas ground people's noses into the squalour.

Jack Carter, eponymous anti-hero of this novel, likes to literally grind people's noses into the sink, or anywhere else handy, in an effort to find out who killed his brother.

Refreshingly utterly non-PC, Jack flits around the town back-handing women because they like it, secretly , being handy with a shooter, remarkin Set in Doncaster in the Seventies, this book is in the great tradition of the It's Grim Up North school, where gritty kitchen sink dramas ground people's noses into the squalour.

Refreshingly utterly non-PC, Jack flits around the town back-handing women because they like it, secretly , being handy with a shooter, remarking occasionally on the multi-culturalism of the area and kicking people around working men's clubs.

The pace never lets up as Jack stalks his prey, following the clues and false trails until he catches up with all of them.

Despite having seen the movie with Michael Caine several times, I didn't picture him as the lead as I read this novel. Perhaps it's because Caine is a Londoner while the tone of this novel was so unremittingly Northern that a Cockney wide-boy, no matter how hard, would stand out like a Chihuahua at a dog track.

I read this book in a day, and it's very few that I can say that about. Excellent stuff. Wow, a brilliant book to which one can truly apply Hobbes's description of life in the state of nature: "nasty, brutish, and short".

A Hobbesian book, too, in its depiction of the war of all against all. Misogyny, both 0f the characters and, I'm afraid, in its totally uncritical portrayal of that, of the book itself, is like a punch in the gut and makes the book hard to read.

Also a very nasty description of the one gay character. But the book is, undeniably, brilliant - taut, compelling, fl Wow, a brilliant book to which one can truly apply Hobbes's description of life in the state of nature: "nasty, brutish, and short".

But the book is, undeniably, brilliant - taut, compelling, flawlessly paced, and linguistically virtuosic.

Btw, the original title was "Jack's Return Home" and I, for one, think that is a vastly superior title. Gritty nihilistic British with a furious pace and bad attitude.

The industrial backdrop is especially effective. I think I prefer the movie version the Michael Caine original not the unspeakable remake , especially in regards to the ending.

Ted Lewis' uber-British Gangster novel of revenage and I am addicted to British gritty crime novels and "Get Carter" is one of the better one's out there.

Tough crime novel by British novelist Lewis. Protagonist Jack Carter, a London hit man, returns to his provincial home city to find out who is responsible for the death of his brother in a faked accident.

Sherlock Holmes would not approve of Carter's detection techniques, but they certainly are effective. Get Carter aka Jack Returns Home.

English mob enforcer Jack Carter returns to his home town to investigate his brother's murder. It is a classic setup, and used brilliantly here.

The book covers roughly three intense days from a Friday evening to Sunday afternoon. Jack digs through his past, meeting old friends and old enemies.

He gets closer to the truth of his brother's death. His bosses send people to order Jack to stop his activities. When he refuses, these friends are told to bring him back any way necessary.

Jack meets his niece, his brother's co-workers and mistress. He peels layer after layer off the sordid side of his old town. As the book races to its climax the action becomes increasingly brutal and unforgiving.

Sub plots pile up; the tension is ratcheted ever higher. Jack has the knowledge and the capacity for violence to keep pushing forward with almost no allies against increasing number of enemies.

As Jack moves through the town he recalls his past, his childhood, old friends long gone, the old neighborhoods as they were in his youth.

It reads like a memoir. How much of the author's own past is used as material in these sections? We may never know, but the detail and precision of the writing reads like the author had intimate knowledge of these people and places.

The book is as much about Jack's personality and his relationship with his brother, as it is about the revenge plot. All the characters are effectively drawn.

The dialogue is crisp, the scene setting vivid. The plot is almost flawless in its construction. Set over a weekend period in October, this eye-popping piece of underworld anarchy by Ted Lewis, hits the sweet spot of every twist and turn and satisfyingly delivers the goods.

Jack Carter returns to the North East to attend the funeral of his elder brother, Frank and his suspicions are gradually confirmed to be true when he uncovers the sordid revelations behind a connected porn racket.

The original title of Lewis' novel was 'Jack's Return Home' and years later was retitled 'Get Carter' t Set over a weekend period in October, this eye-popping piece of underworld anarchy by Ted Lewis, hits the sweet spot of every twist and turn and satisfyingly delivers the goods.

The original title of Lewis' novel was 'Jack's Return Home' and years later was retitled 'Get Carter' to tie-in with the smash success of the film adaptation starring Michael Caine.

The film was set in Newcastle-upon-Tyne and the surrounding area, but here in the novel the setting is believed to be Scunthorpe after our protagonist changes trains at Doncaster to embark upon an explosive weekend of violence and debauchery in which the finale is just as shocking as its film counterpart, only moreso.

A heart-banging trip of sheer dynamite with a brilliant main character! This is the book that became the movie GET CARTER and it's terrific for its fusion of social realist themes derived from the kitchen sink tradition with the pace and structure of an urban thriller or urban western.

This was the stuff that made s crime fiction so great. Lewis also invented the regional crime drama. He was the first!

Shelves: suspense-thriller , read , audio-books , roman-noir. Nick Perry's dramatisation of Ted Lewis's crime classic. Shelves: fradio , too-sexy-for-maiden-aunts , revenge , families , autumn , noir , radio-4 , gangsters , published , summer Bettie's Books Bettie's Books Jack, born and raised in the northern steel town, left home quite some time ago to make his fortune in London, and, being a handy lad and inclined towards pitiless immorality, he eventually found his place as a mob enforcer.

Since then, Jack has done all kinds of awful things at the behest of his employers, East End racketeers, Les and Gerald Fletcher, and in so doing, has earned himself a real reputation.

Quite often, though, he lets his heart rule his head. But even more so is this return to Scunthorpe. But now Frank is dead, killed in an apparent drink-driving accident.

Frank was a barman, after all, and he worked in a particularly rough part of a particularly rough town. However, he was not known to be an unstable character, and in fact, compared to his brother, was a clean-living citizen — and this is the point where Jack becomes curious, refusing to believe that Frank would have climbed into his car having consumed an entire bottle of whiskey.

It is only , and blue movies are still taboo, but there is a voracious demand for them on the underground circuit, particularly among those interested in the sex adventures of very, very young females.

Jack continues to resist, even when he receives direct orders from Gerald and Les, as delivered by a pair of London hitmen, the brutal Con McCarty and camp-as-hell Peter the Dutchman And what role does Doreen play?

The more Jack evades attempts on his life, the more unedifying truths he uncovers, and the more personal this becomes.

In fact, later editions of the novel were republished under that very title. In truth, there are a lot of similarities, even down to certain lines of dialogue, but there are some differences too.

In addition to that, perhaps the most famous liberty the movie took was in its transposition of the story from Scunthorpe to the even more grimily picturesque Newcastle.

That said, none of these are really major issues. Where both the novel and the movie are united is in their warts-and-all portrayal of an unforgiving British gangland, setting their narratives against dingy working-class backdrops, and underscoring them with a level of sleaze that has shocking power even today.

But back to the novel. He could create atmosphere for sure, but he was no poet. I can only imagine the strength of this narrative back in On occasion, he reminisces about his early youth — the last happy time he knew, we suspect — when he and Frank got on their bikes and explored the woods and wastelands on the outskirts of town.

These are moving sequences and poignant reminders that even monsters once were children. As such, for the bulk of this novel, Jack is a coldly merciless figure.

But with his sad and premature death at the age of 42, the series ended there. I'd never read the novel before, but saw its film adaptation many years ago.

I remembered it as a brisk, hard-boiled crime flick, and remembered Michael Caine's take on the protagonist in particular. This is not Batman 's courtly Alfred; this is not the charming rogue whatever his name was of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.

Those later Caine parts, vs. Daniel Craig's. I can now say that Caine's remembered performance, in other words, matched I'd never read the novel before, but saw its film adaptation many years ago.

I can now say that Caine's remembered performance, in other words, matched the novel's depiction of the character perfectly.

Jack's an example of what is called, I think, a "hard man" -- underworld jargon for what might also be called, less kindly, a thug.

He returns to his hometown after many years for a sad occasion: his brother Frank's funeral. But mourning does not suit a hard man, especially a smart one with a dangerously insatiable curiosity.

Before long, Jack concludes that the automobile accident in which Frank died smacks of something other than an accident, after all.

The book documents, in Jack's rat-a-tat narrator's voice, the few days it takes him to set things about as right as they'll ever be.

Get Carter 's prose could serve as a textbook example of hardboiled voice. The club was crowded. Old men sat riveted by dominoes. Young men thronged the six dart boards.

There was no music, no singing, no women. Just the bad lighting and the good dark brown beer and the plain floor and a bar that was decorated only by some barrels of beer lined up at one end.

It's almost Hemingwayish, except that this book's author, Ted Lewis, clearly had no literary pretensions: every monosyllable serves no purpose beyond the story.

Even that sample, in its focus on setting, does nothing but frame the canvas. The words and the rhythm are merciless, and, well, that's Jack all over.

It kept me riveted, start to finish. So why only four stars? Here's the thing: nothing like softness exists in Jack Carter's world, and he won't pretend it does.

Consider his final moment with Frank, by himself beside the casket just before the funeral: "Well, Frank," I said.

I said a few words although I don't know what I said and bowed my head on the edge of the casket for a few minutes, then I sat up and undid my coat and took out my fags.

I lit up and blew out the smoke slowly and looked at the last of Frank. Nothing soft, see? Nothing sentimental.

The resistance to that fifth star is wholly mine, at this moment in the US of Over the course of the book, Jack encounters a handful of women, all of them with some tie to Frank, and also with one tie or another to Jack's adversaries.

He treats them coldly, and occasionally brutally, and reports these ugly moments in flat tones. A common locution: "I gave her one alongside the head.

But against a backdrop of recent headlines, reading these scenes in Get Carter required of me a lot of mental disengagement. If you can manage that trick more easily than I could -- regarding the story entirely in its own terms, given its setting, time, and characters -- and if your tastes in fiction encompass the noir and the hard-boiled, I have no doubt that you'll reach for the fifth star yourself.

Highly recommended. Although this is not a book I would have picked up on my own it's my book club's September choice , I found Ted Lewis' writing refreshing simply in that it is so different from most of what I've read recently or ever!?

The British references certainly contribute to that, but there's a rough-and-tumble, Hobbesian view of life Lewis employs lived? Speaking of "character," Lewis' characterizations are first-rate.

He borrows a bit from Dickens in that regard, as it's easy to see the type of people the protagonist Jack Carter describes. To summarize, Carter returns to his hometown for the funeral of his estranged brother, Frank, who has died in a straightforward manner--drunk, in a car accident--except for the fact that Frank never has been known to drink to excess, and never scotch, in any case.

Complicating things are the presence of Frank's or is she really Jack's? The dividing line between the two allies and enemies is fuzzy, to say the least, but Carter is determined to discover who was responsible for Frank's death, and what it was Frank knew that made him a target for fatal violence.

When I ended the book, I noticed a short biography of its author, Lewis, along with a photo of him on a back fly-leaf.

Lewis lived from , barely surpassing the assumed lifespan of his "hero," so I'm guessing he knew a little about the nature of the circumstances Carter endured from Seeing his bio and photo made the story that much more compelling.

This was tough to get through, which is impressive because it wasn't especially long, dense, or literary.

I guess the British slang was a little weird, but that wasn't what bothered me. If I could identify a culprit, it was that Lewis went into such absurd detail describing actions and surroundings that didn't matter.

If I read carefully, I'm sure I could piece together a map of every single location in the book, but what's the point?

It gives me a greater appreciation for writers like Chandler This was tough to get through, which is impressive because it wasn't especially long, dense, or literary.

It gives me a greater appreciation for writers like Chandler who was so economical with his prose, cutting to the chase by providing a feeling of what's going on if not necessarily every little detail.

The story was dull, about a guy trying to avenge his brother's death and find the murderer. There were the typical crime staples along the way, tough guys and weak, troubled women who need them.

Or double cross them. Or whatever. Honestly, I lost interest early on and probably should have given up on it. But I persevered.

And, as usual, I was rewarded with an agonizing experience and a little bit of regret. Next time I'm bored of a book after the first 40 - 50 pages, I'll think back on this one and remind myself that it's just not worth it.

If one were looking for a tough guy crime novel, with violence aplenty, sort of like a Mickey Spillane from the North of England, this fits the bill.

If one were looking for a British version of Richard Stark's Parker novels, this fits the bill. If one wanted a print equivalent to a Jason Statham movie, this fits the bill.

However, Ted Lewis invests this nasty bit of fiction with vivid descriptions of a dying industrial town the steel mill and the brick factory become characters in the book , the type of place where grim prospects are varnished over by pints of bitter and football.

He drops fun allusions to Doctor Who and soft-core filmmaker Harrison Marks. There is humor grim , social commentary, and mayhem for all in the first book of the Carter trilogy the others will be coming this fall too.

I assume Lewis was inspired by Richard Stark. Does anyone know for sure? Originally published as Jack's Return Home it was republished as Get Carter , which is also the name of the film starring Michael Caine.

A tale of revenge in British noir of the s that takes place in the gritty industrial north. Jack Carter - It's a rainy night in the mill town of Scunthorpe when a London fixer named Jack Carter steps off a northbound train.

He's left the neon lights and mod lifestyle of Soho behind to come north to his hometo 1 in the Jack Carter Trilogy. He's left the neon lights and mod lifestyle of Soho behind to come north to his hometown for a funeral--his brother Frank's.

Frank was very drunk when he drove his car off a cliff and that doesn't sit well with Jack. Jack and Frank didn't exactly like one another.

They hadn't spoken in years and Jack is far from the sentimental type. Verleiher -. Produktionsjahr Filmtyp Spielfilm.

Wissenswertes -. Budget -. Sprachen Englisch. Produktions-Format -. Farb-Format Farbe. Tonformat -. Seitenverhältnis -.

Visa-Nummer -. Carter — über ihn ist nichts bekannt. Aber Frauen sind für Carter nur Dutzendware; er schläft mit ihnen, doch das bedeutet wirklich nichts.

Carter ist Profikiller, trinkt bitteres Bier nur aus einem dünnwandigen Glas und hat Telefonsex mit Anna, während die Inhaberin einer Pension, Edna Rosemarie Dunham , eine Frau in mittleren Jahren, keine zwei Meter von ihm entfernt im Schaukelstuhl hin und her wippt.

Jack rechnet ab Trailer OV. Das könnte dich auch interessieren. Schauspielerinnen und Schauspieler. Michael Caine.

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4 Replies to “Jack rechnet ab”

  1. Es ist schade, dass ich mich jetzt nicht aussprechen kann - es gibt keine freie Zeit. Aber ich werde befreit werden - unbedingt werde ich schreiben dass ich in dieser Frage denke.

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